Subject:      Re: Pre-columbian Europian visits to Americas.
From:         yuku@mail.trends.ca (Yuri Kuchinsky)
Date:         1997/05/07
Message-ID:   <5kqb31$lb9$1@trends.ca>
Newsgroups:   sci.archaeology

Fcattus ([22]fcattus@aol.com) wrote:
: No you're not a "huge fool who should shut up," or whatever you wrote, but
: you're a person liable to get a lot of unwanted info!  This topic has been
: beaten to death---here and elsewhere, so you should look for some of it.

Dear John,

Sure, this topic hasn't just "been invented". And many wacky claims _have_
been made in the past by overenthusiastic proponents. But beaten to death?
Well, not exactly, considering that quite a bit of new research has
appeared in the last few years. And support for theories suggesting
transoceanic contacts in ancient past often has come from some rather
unexpected sources recently, such as researchers discovering traces of
strange plants in Egyptian mummies...

: Check out the books by Ken Feder and Steve Williams for skeptical surveys
: of most of thwese claims. And the 1961 (?) Lost Tribes and Sunken
: Continents, by Wauchope is still excellent.  I've published a lot on this
: topic. Basically, the hyperdiffusionist cases almost all fall apart when
: looked at closely

Almost, but surely not always.

How about this bit of information dealing with calendrics. This comes from
the scholar whose research is key in this area of comparing the New and
the Old World astronomy and astrology.

[begin quote]

>From David H. Kelley, AN ESSAY ON PRE-COLUMBIAN CONTACTS BETWEEN THE
AMERICAS AND OTHER AREAS, in RACE, DISCOURSE, AND THE ORIGIN OF THE
AMERICAS, Smithsonian, 1995

Comparative mythology is tied to comparative religious studies, to
the role of astronomy in ancient religion, and to comparative
calendrics. All such comparisons involve partial systemic
correspondences. Such evidence is quite acceptable to linguists, for
they are constantly dealing with parts of systems that have
themselves frequently undergone regular and specifiable changes.
Such partial systemic correspondences are disliked by
archaeologists... (p. 118)

I have done a great deal of work on Mesoamerican and Eurasian
parallels in calendar system. These parallels fall entirely in the
realm of partial systemic correspondences. Of the day-names of the
Mesoamerican calendar, all have parallels in one of four Eurasian
systems, three of which are attested in northern India. (p. 119)

[end quote]

Any comments on this? Do you really think all these clear parallels could
be attributed to some weird co-incidence?

And what about the famous "rabbit-on-the-moon" parallels? What would be
the chance that two cultures on different sides of the ocean both will see
-- independently? -- a rabbit on the moon pounding medicinal drugs in a
pestle?

Best regards,

Yuri.

Yuri Kuchinsky   | "Where there is the Tree of Knowledge, there
     -=-         | is always Paradise: so say the most ancient
 in Toronto      | and the most modern serpents."  F. Nietzsche
 ----- my webpage is for now at: [23]http://www.io.org/~yuku -----
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