Subject:      Carthaginian Station on Azores 320 BC (Re: Navigation -- 
	      to the New
From:         SENECA@argo.rhein-neckar.de
Date:         1997/06/21
Message-ID:   <6ZJhhm4Q3SB@argo.rhein-neckar.de>
Newsgroups:   soc.history.ancient,sci.skeptic,
	      sci.archaeology.mesoamerican,sci.archaeology

Out of a book in German:  Hennig, Richard: Terrae Incognitae, Leiden 1953,
Vol. III, Chapter 19 (p. 138 c.).

==========

DISCOVERY OF THE AZORES BY THE CARTHAGINIANS AND THE QUESTION OF AN EARLY
KNOWLEDGE OF AMERICA

(Time c. 320 BC, ancient sources not available)

[now Hennig cites a swedish source in german translation, what is like all
other here further translated to english, the german version appended
below]

From Goteborgske Wetenskap og Witterhets Samlingar 1778, I, 106:

"Some annotations to the voyages of the ancient, derived from several
Carthaginian and Cyrenian coins which were found in 1749 on one of the
Azores' islands. 

By Johann Podolyn,

        In November of 1749, after several days of storm from the west,
which caused part of the foundation of a destroyed stone building on the
beach of the island of Corvo to be exposed by the sea, a broken, black
clay container was discovered in which a lot of coins were found which
were brought to a monastery, where they were spread amongst the curious
natives. Part of the coins were sent off to Lisbon and from there later to
Father Florenz in Madrid. 

The number of the coins found in the container is unknown, as is the
number of those sent to Lisbon. 9 coins arrived in Madrid, namely: 

2 Carthaginian gold coins, No. 1 and 2
5 Carthaginian copper coins, No. 3 to 7
2 Cyrenian coins of the same metal, No. 8 and 9

Father Florenz gave those coins to me as a present during my visitation of
Madrid in 1761 and reported that the whole discovery had not consisted of
more different kinds than those 9 and that these coins were selected as
the best preserved ones. 

It is certain that the coins come partly from Carthage, partly from the
Cyrenaica. They are not very rare, except

[Drawing of the coins, obverse and reverse: The Carthaginian and Cyrenian
coins found in 1749 on the Azores. The two golden ones. Annotation by
Hennig: "These are two so-called serrati, according to Dannenberg's
Numismatics, Leipzig 1891, p. 155, striking is the location where they
were found."]

It is well-known that the Portuguese, first in the time of Alfons V., have
discovered the Azores. There is no clue for the assumption that someone
could have buried the coins there after that time. They must therefore
have arrived there together with some Punic vehicles, whereas I do not
dare to claim that the vehicle sailed there by intention, it could as well
have ended up there by coincidence. 

Carthage and several Mauretanian cities sent off some ships over the
Strait of Gibraltar. Hanno's expedition to the African West Coast is
known, and one of these different vehicles might have been driven to Corvo
by constant wind from the east. Faria [annot. Hennig: Manoel de Faria e
Sousa: Epitome de las historias portuguezas, Madrid 1628] says in his
Portuguese History that the Portuguese, which then arrived first in that
country, found a horseman's statue by some foothills whose right hand
pointed to the west.  This statue stood, according to Faria, on a stone
pedestal into which unknown letters were carved everywhere. The monument
was destroyed, which was a big loss. Blind eagerness was the cause for
this, as the statue was regarded as a pagan idol. 

The statue strengthens my opinion that the islands were not only
accidentally visited by the Phoenicians or the Carthaginians but that they
had already settled there; for you cannot assume that a ship determined
either for trade or for discovery had the whole statue already on board.
You must rather conclude that they arrived there on one vehicle or several
ones, during one voyage or several ones, that the crew liked the land,
that they setteld there, established a municipality, kept up the
connection to their home, and that they achieved a wealth which allowed
them to build the mentioned monument. 

It is also possible that the Carthaginians, whose eagerness in trade and
navigation is famous, took an expedition to the west from this island and
that the statue pointing to the west referred to that expedition. Storms,
earthquakes and volcanic eruptions which caused immense damage could also
have been the cause for the emigration of the citizens who then erected
the monument with the reference to the west in order to show which way
they left. Maybe they knew of any land there. Several speculations and
opinions can be expressed in favour and against, but it seems to be
sufficiently sure that the islands were visited by the ancients. Whether
coincidence or intention was the cause cannot be answered. 

---------------

Now discussion of the source by Hennig, p. 145, excerpt:

(...)

A clarification by the Munich numismatologist Prof. Bernhart, to whom the
issue unknown until then was presented for a final decision by means of my
explanations through my eager colleague Prof. Stechow-Munich, puts an end
to the whole discussion. He let, through Stechow's mediation, the
following be reported to me: 

        "The doubt expressed by some people whether Father Flore was not
cheated by a crook, that the coins in fact did actually not come from the
Azores, was completely unthinkable; the discovery was c e r t a i n l y a
u t h e n t i c, i. e. it came from the Carthaginians. Simply because, at
that time, even the cleverest swindler was not able to put together such
an excellent series of Carthaginian coins from such a narrow period of
time (330-320 BC) correctly. In specialist circles, the Carthaginian and
Cyrenian coins were by far not known well enough, and the numasmatic
science was by far not experienced enough so that it was not even possible
to put together (for instance from pieces found in North Africa or Spain)
a set like that one, which was from such a narrow period of time. If
someone had wanted to create such a fraud at that time, he would have, in
the best case, put together coins from several different centuries; at
that time, no one would probably have noticed the fraud." 

This authoritative expert opinion was announced by me in 1937. It is
probably final now. I have therefore spoken of a "numismatic final word"
and drawn the conclusion: 

        "The discovery of Corvo is proven to be authentic and therefore
the discovery of the Azores by the Carthaginians in late 4th century BC is
finally secured." 

In fact, since 1937, under the weight of Bernhart's proofs, no one,
according to my knowledge, ever doubted again that the coins of Corvo
could have been brought to the location of the finding by the
Carthaginians themselves and that it must be an authentic depot finding. 

(...)
--------------------

Further on, Hennig accepts the visitation of the Azores by the
Carthaginians, but he believes: "It is very probable that their visit to
the Azores was quite involuntary." He means that a ship was driven there
by a storm. He completely ignores the statement of the source about the
location of the finding: "the foundation of a destroyed stone building on
the beach of the island of Corvo exposed by the sea", according to which
the clay jug with the coins was intentionally buried and not the leftover
of a wreck. 

The stone building must have been from ancient times, otherwise the jug
would already have been discovered when the foundation was built. These
circumstances make a repeated visitation of the Azores probable, otherwise
neither money nor buildings would have been left behind. 

Hennig regards the horseman's statue as a legend and refers to stories
about the "picture columns of Hercules" and cites Arabian sources about
horseman's statues on islands in the Atlantic. He belives that the report
in the Portuguese History was fed by such legends. He does not even take
into consideration that such legends could come from ancient reports. 

A very intersting part in the report regarding the horseman's statue is
that it is supposed to have "stood on a stone pedestal into which unknown
letters were carved everywhere". This is actually a clue to a Phoenician
origin!  All other alphabets of that time, even the Arabic, Gothic and
Hebrew ones, were known to the Portuguese, although they perhaps could not
read them.  But they could not know Phoenician letters, that was the only
script that had died out more than 1000 years ago. 

And there is another clue to this, Hennig, p. 146, writes:  "Allegedly,
together with the coins of Corvo, mysterious writings in an unknown
language were found, which governor Pedro d'Afonseca is to have reproduced
in wax [Source: Mees, J.: Historie de la decouverte des Iles Acores, Gent
1901, p.25]. But they are, just like the reproduction, unfortunately
missing, and it is not determinable anymore what that was all about."
Hennig confuses language and writing here. The wax reproductions were
necessary to secure the letters, otherwise the writings could also have
been copied through handwriting. 

These circumstances exclusively advocate a Phoenician/Carthaginian
discovery of the Azores and at least a temporary installation of a small
settlement (stone buildings) there. As a stopover from and to America it
would have been a perfect place for the support and maintenance of ships.
The finding report of the coins also hints why no traces of it are found
today. In 1749, the foundation of the stone building was exposed by the
sea during a storm. It was therefore near the beach. It has certainly not
been built there because of the danger to be destroyed by the sea.
Apparently, in the past 2000 years, the sea has washed away more and more
of the coast, the Carthaginian settlement was originally probably a few
hundred meters on the land, 1749 the remains were on the beach and today
it is completely under water. 

This is not a proof for the discovery of America in the ancient world, but
it is an interesting puzzle piece. 

MfG

SENECA

==================================================================
Here the same in german for confirming the translation above:

Hennig, Richard: Terrae Incognitae, Leiden 1953, Bd. 3, Kap. 19
(p. 138ff.):

ERREICHUNG DER AZOREN DURCH DIE KARTHAGER UND DIE FRAGE
EINER FRUEHEN KENNINIS AMERIKAS.

(um 320 v. Chr.)
(Antike Nachrichten liegen nicht vor).


Aus Goteborgske Wetenskap og Witterhets Samlingar 1778, I, 106:

  "Einige Anmerkungen zur Seefahrt der Alten, in Anlehnung an
einige karthagische und kyrenaeische Muenzen, die im Jahre 1749
auf einer der Azoreninseln gefunden wurden.

Von Johann Podolyn,

        Im Novembermonat 1749, nach einigen Tagen Weststurrn,
der bewirkte, dass vom Meer ein Teil des Fundaments eines am
Strand stehenden, zerstoerten Steinbaues auf der Insel Corvo
blossgespuelt wurde, gewahrte man ein zerbrochenes, schwarzes
Tongefass, in dem man eine Menge Muenzen fand, die zugleich mit
dem Gefaess nach einem Kloster gebracht wurden, wo die Muenzen
unter die von der Insel stammenden Neugierigen verteilt wurden.
Ein Teil dieser Muenzen wurde nach Lissabon und von dort spater
an den Pater Florez in Madrid gesandt.

Wie gross die Anzahl war, die man in dem Gefass gefunden hatee,
ist nicht bekannt, auch nicht, wie viele nach Lissabon geschickt
wurden. Nach Madrid gelangten 9 Stueck, und zwar:

2 karthagische Goldmuenzen, No. 1 und 2,

5 karthagische Kupfermuenzen. No. 3=7,

2 kyrenaeische Muenzen vom selben Metall, No. 8 und 9.

Pater Florez schenkte mir diese Muenzen gelegentlich meines
Besuches in Madrid i. J. 1761 und berichtete, dass der ganze
Fund aus nicht mehr Sorten als diesen 9 bestanden habe und dass
diese Muenzen, als die am besten erhaltenen, ausgesucht worden
waren.

Dass die Muenzen teils aus Karthago, teils aus der Cyrenaica
stammten, ist gewiss. Sie sind niche besonders selten, mit

 [Zeichnung der Muenzen, Vorder- +  Rueckseiten]

Die i. J. 1749 zuf den Azoren gefundenen karthagischen
und cyrenaeischen Muenzen

Ausnahme der zwei goldenen [Anm. Hennig: Es handelt sich um zwei
sogenannte serrati, gemaess Dannenbergs Muenzkunde, Leipzig 1891, 155]
das Auffallige ist aber der Ort, wo sie gefunden wurden.

Es ist bekannt, dass die Portugiesen, zuerst zu Alfons' V. Zeit, die
Azoreninseln entdeckt haben. Man hat keinen Anhalt fur die Annahrne,
dass jemand die Muenzen nach dieser Zeit dort vergraben haben konnte.
Sie muessen also mit irgend welchen punischen Fahrzeugen dort hin
gekommen sein, ohne dass ich jedoch zu behaupten wage, dies Fahrzeug
sei absichtlich hierher gesegelt; es kann ebenso gut hierher
verschlagen worden sein.

Karthago und mehrere mauretanische Stadte sandten manche Schiffe ueber
die Gibraltarstrasse hinaus. Hannos Expedition an die afrikanische
Westkueste ist bekannt, und eines von diesen verschiedenen Fahrzeugen
duerfte durch staendige ostliche Winde nach Corvo getrieben worden
sein. Faria [Anm. Hennig: Manoel de Faria e Sousa: Epitome de las
historias portuguezas, Madrid 1628] sagt in seiner portugiesischen
Geschichet, dass die Portugiesen, die damals in dieses Land zuerst
kamen, an einem Vorgebirge eine Statue zu Pferde fanden, die mit der
Rechten nach Westen zeigte. Diese Statue habe auf einem Stein
Piedestal gestanden, auf dem uberall unbekannte Buchstaben eingeritzt
waren. Dieses Denkmal wurde zerstort, was ein grosser Verlust war.
Blinder Eifer war hierfur die Ursache, weil man annahm, es sei ein
heidnischer Abgott. Diese Statue bestaerkt mich in der Meinung, dass
die Inseln von den Phoeniziern oder den Karthagern nicht nur zufallig
oder bei einer Sturmverschlagung besucht wurden, sondern dass sie dort
schon festen Fuss gefasse haeten; denn man kann doch nicht annehmen,
dass ein entweder fuer den Handel oder fur Entdeckungen bestimmtes
Schiff das genannte Denkmal schon an Bord hatte. Man muss vielmehr
schliessen, dass sie auf einem Fahrzeug oder mehreren, auf einer
Reise oder mehreren dorthin kamen, dass der Besatzung das Land gefiel,
dass sie sich dore ansiedelte, ein Gemeinwesen begruendete, die
Verbindung mit der Heimat aufrecht erhielt und zu solchem Wohlstand
gelangte, dass das erwahnte Denkmal errichtet werden konnte. Es ist
auch moglich, dass die Karthager, deren Eifer in Handel und Seefahre
bekannt ist, von dieser Insel aus eine Expedition nach Westen
unternahmen und dass die nach Westen weisende Statue auf diese
Expedition Bezug nahm. Es koennen auch Stuerme, Erdbeben und
Vulkanausbrueche, die auf dieser Insel grossen Schaden anrichteten,
die Ursache fur die Auswanderung der Bewohner gewesen sein, die nun
das Denkmal mit dem Hinweis auf den Westen errichteten, zum Zeichen,
auf welchem Wege sie davongezogen waren. Vielleicht wussten sie dort
von irgend einem Lande. Mehrere Mutmassungen und Meinungen koenen fuer
und wider geaeussert werden, aber es scheint hinreichend sicher zu sein,
dass die Inseln von den Alten besucht worden sind. Ob dabei Zufall oder
Absicht im Spiel war, muss dahingestellt bleiben."

---------------

Nun Diskussion der Quelle durch Hennig, S. 145, Auszug:

(...)

Den Schlusspunkt unter die ganze Diskussion setzt wohl eine Klarstellung
des Muenchener Nummismatikers Prof. Bernhart, dem der bis dahin
unbekannt gewesene Streitfall an Hand meiner Darlegungen durch meinen
eifrigen Mitarbeiter Prof. Stechow-Muenchen zur Entscheidung vorgelegt
wurde. Er liess mir durch Stechow'sche Vermittlung freundlichst Folgendes
mitteilen:

        "Der von einzelnen Stellen geausserte Zweifel, ob Pater Flore
damals nicht von einem Schwindler dupiert worden sei, dass also die
Muenzen garnicht von den Azoren stammten, sei vollkommen undenkbar;
der Fund sei b e s t i m m t  e c h t, d.h. er ruehre von den
Karthagern her. Und zwar allein schon deshalb, weil damals (um 1760)
auch der raffinierteste Schwindler garnicht im stande gewesen ware, eine
so ausgezeichnete Serie von karthagischen Munzen aus einem so engen
Zeitraum (330-320 v. Chr )) richtig zusammenzustellen. Man kannte
damals in Fachkreisen die karthagischen und kyrenischen Muenzen
noch bei weitem nicht genau genug, und die numismatische Wissenschaft
war damals bei weitem nicht so weit, dass es uberhaupt moglich gewesen
waere, eine Serie wie diese, aus so engem Zeitraum stammende, etwa aus
Stuecken, die in Nordafrika oder Spanien gefunden waren, zusammenzustellen.
Haette damals jemand einen solchen Schwindel machen wollen, so hatte er
bestenfalls alle moglichen Muenzen aus verschiedenen Jahrhunderten
zusammengewuerfelt; damals hatte den Schwindel wohl Niemand bemerkt".

Dieses autoritative Gutachten habe ich 1937 bekannt gegeben 19) Es ist
daran wohl nicht mehr zu ruetteln. Ich habe daher von einem
"muenzkundlichen Schlusswort'' gesprochen und die Folgerung gezogen:

      ,,Der Fund von Corvo ist als echt erwiesen und darnit die Erreichung
der Azoren durch Karthager des endenden 4. Jhds v Chr endgueltig
sichergestellt".

Tatsachlich ist seit 1937 unter dem Gewicht der Bernhart'schen Beweise
meines Wissens nirgends mehr angezweifelt worden, dass die Corvo-Muenzen
nur von Karthagern selbst an die Fundstatte gebracht worden sein koennen
und dass es sich um einen echten Depotfund handeln muss.

(...)
--------------------

Im weiteren aktzeptiert Hennig den Besuch der Azoren durch Karthager,
glaubt aber: "Es ist hoechst wahrscheinlich, dass ihr Besuch auf
den Azoren durchaus unfreiwillig war". Er mein damit ein vom Sturm
verschlagenes Schiff. Er ignoriert voellig die Aussage der Quelle
ueber den Fundort: "dass vom Meer ein Teil des Fundaments eines am
Strand stehenden, zerstoerten Steinbaues auf der Insel Corvo
blossgespuelt wurde ...", wonach der Tonkrug mit den Muenzen gezielt
vergraben und nicht ueberrest eines Wracks war. Auch musste der
Steinbau aus antiker Zeit stammen, sonst waere der Krug bereits
beim Bau des Fundamentes entdeckt worden. Diese Umstaende machen
ein wiederholtes Aufsuchen der Azoren wahrscheinlich, man
laesst sonst weder Steinhaeuser noch Geld zurueck.

Die Reiterstatue haellt Hennig fuer eine Legende und verweist auf
Geschichten von "Bildsaeulen des Herkules" und zitiert arabische
Quellen von Reiterstandbildern auf Inseln im Atlantik. Er glaubt,
der Bericht in der portugisischen Geschichte sei aus solchen Legenden
gespeist. Er erwaegt nicht einmal, dass diese Legenden aus antiken
Berichten stammen koennten.

Sehr interessant an dem Bericht ueber die Reiterstatue ist die Erwaehnung
sie "habe auf einem Stein Piedestal gestanden, auf dem uberall unbekannte
Buchstaben eingeritzt waren." Dies ist gerade ein Hinweis auf einen
phoenizischen Ursprung! Alle anderen Alphabete der Zeit, auch arabisch,
gotisch, und hebraeisch, waren den Portugiesen damals bekannt, auch wenn
sie es nicht lesen konnten. Phoenizische Schrift aber konnten sie nicht
einmal kennen, dies war die einzige seit ueber 1000 Jahren ausgestorbene
Schriftart.

Und darauf gibt es noch einen weiteren Hinweis, Hennig, S.146 schreibt:
"Angeblich sind uebrigens mit den Muenzen auf Corvo auch raetselhafte
Schriftstuecke in einer unbekannten Sprache gefunden worden, die
der Gouverneur Pedro d`Afonseca soll in Wachs haben nachbilden
lassen [Quelle: Mees, J.: Historie de la decouverte des Iles Acores,
Gent 1901, p.25]. Aber sie sind, ebenso wie die Nachbildungen,
leider verschollen, und es ist nicht mehr festzustellen, was es
damit fuer eine Bewandnis hatte." Hennig verwechselt hier Sprache
und Schrift. Die Wachsnachbildungen waren noetig um die unbekannten
Schriftzeichen zu sichern, ansonsten haette man es auch abschreiben
koennen.

Diese Umstaende sprechen ausschliesslich fuer eine phoenizisch/
karthagische Entdeckung der Azoren. Ebenso fuer eine zumindest
zeitweise Einrichtung einer kleinen Siedelung (Steinbau) dort.
Als Zwischenstation von und nach Amerika waere es ein idealer
Platz gewesen zum versorgen und warten von Schiffen. Der
Fundbericht der Muenzen weist auch daraufhin warum man heute
keine Spuren mehr davon findet. Im Jahre 1749 wurde das
Fundament des Hauses vom Meer im Sturm freigespuelt. Es
war also an Strandnaehe. Dort war es aber sicher nicht gebaut
wurden, in der Gefahr vom Meer zerstoert zu werden. Offenbar
hat das Meer in den vergangenen 2000 Jahren immer mehr von der
Kueste weggespuelt, die karthagische Siedlung war urspruenglich
wohl einige 100 m an Land, 1749 die Reste am Strand und heute
unter Wasser.

Ein Beweis fuer die Entdeckung Amerikas in der Antike ist das ganze
noch nicht, aber ein interessantes Puzzlestueck.


			*************


Subject:      Re: Carthaginian Station on Azores 320 BC 
	      (Re: Navigation -- to the New
From:         yuku@mail.trends.ca (Yuri Kuchinsky)
Date:         1997/06/26
Message-ID:   <5oui1j$fo8$1@trends.ca>
Newsgroups:   soc.history.ancient,sci.skeptic,sci.archaeology.mesoamerican,sci.
archaeology

Miguel,

Slow down a little, please, friend. You may be jumping to conclusions
here...

Miguel Angel Ruz ([22]marf@tid.es) wrote:
: [23]SENECA@argo.rhein-neckar.de wrote:

: ! Out of a book in german:
: ! Hennig, Richard: Terrae Incognitae, Leiden 1953, Vol. III, Chapter 19
: ! (p. 138 c.):

Hennig wrote his book in the 1940s.

: ! DISCOVERY OF THE AZORES BY THE CARTHAGINIANS AND THE QUESTION
: ! OF AN EARLY KNOWLEDGE OF AMERICA

        ...

: ! 2 Carthaginian gold coins, No. 1 and 2
: ! 5 Carthaginian copper coins, No. 3 to 7
: ! 2 Cyrenian coins of the same metal, No. 8 and 9

This above is a quote from Podolyn, writing in 1778. If a mistake was
made, this _was not_ Hennig's mistake. Podolyn probably meant "bronze"
instead of "copper". Knowledge of Phoenician coins was probably not great
in 1778.

        ...

: A few lines below Hennig says that the coins are not very rare.

Not Hennig, Podolyn!

: Do you really think that a Carthaginian COPPER coin from 320 BC
: is not very rare? Of course, nothing is impossible, but
: Carthaginians never (as far as I know) minted copper coins. In
: fact, copper was not used for coins until much more later,
: and most of the Carthaginian coins from the IV century BC were
: gold coins.

You may well be correct about this, and Podolyn probably did not know
about this.

        ...

: ! It is certain that the coins come partly from Carthage, partly
: ! from the Cyrenaica. They are not very rare, except the two
: ! golden ones [annot. Hennig: These are two so-called serrati,
: ! according to Dannenberg's Numismatics, Leipzig 1891, p. 155],

Hennig says this based on Dannenberg. He (or Dannenberg) may or may not be
correct about these "serrati". If they are not "serrati", this will not
make any differerence whatsoever to the larger argument, I believe.

: These gold coins could be even more interesting, mainly because
: "serrati" is a term used to denote a roman kind of denarius,
: first minted around (if my memory does not fail) 120 B.C. Just
: look in Crawford´s "Roman Republican Coins" to see some denarii
: serrati. Of course, being a roman republican denarius, this coins
: were made in silver.

        ...

: ! A clarification by the Munich numismatologist Prof. Bernhart, to
: ! whom the issue unknown until then was presented for a final
: ! decision by means of my explanations through my eager colleague
: ! Prof. Stechow-Munich, puts an end to the whole discussion. He
: ! let, through Stechow's mediation, the following be reported to me:
: !
: !         "The doubt expressed by some people whether Father Flore
: ! was not cheated by a crook, that the coins in fact did actually
: ! not come from the Azores, was completely unthinkable; the
: ! discovery was c e r t a i n l y a u t h e n t i c, i. e. it came
: ! from the Carthaginians.

Prof. Stechow-Munich never said these coins were copper. He never said
they were serrati. What he said was that _the coins are authentic_. And
this is what really matters here.

        ...

: I just wonder how could he date so accurately Carthaginian coins
: found out of any context, specially the copper ones.

I have no idea, but apparently he was a recognized expert, so I would tend
to believe him.

: I am not saying that is impossible that a Carthaginian ship reaches
: Azores. But this article is so unaccurate

The article may contain some inaccuracies, but they cannot be attributed
to Hennig, with perhaps a small exception about "serrati". And this is
insignificant to the larger argument.

: that I will not take it
: into account (I'm looking now for the other reference posted about
: a NUMISMA 1962 article. If I have enough time to find and read it
: I will try to post sometinhg about it)

Please let us know if you find any more information about this interesting
find.

Best,

Yuri.

Yuri Kuchinsky   | "Where there is the Tree of Knowledge, there
     -=-         | is always Paradise: so say the most ancient
 in Toronto      | and the most modern serpents."  F. Nietzsche
 ----- my webpage is for now at: [24]http://www.io.org/~yuku -----
   _________________________________________________________________


Click here to go one level up in the directory.