Subject:      Re: Wisc. PreColumbian Horse--Fraud?
From:         yuku@mail.trends.ca (Yuri Kuchinsky)
Date:         1997/09/28
Message-ID:   <60kabl$3u5$1@news.trends.ca>
Newsgroups:   sci.archaeology

Fcattus ([22]fcattus@aol.com) wrote:

: etc. Yuri, does it not strike you as odd that everyone who disagrees with
: you is being "cute" or "pathetic" or "lying" or "ignorant" and so forth?  I
: sure wish everyone *I* ever disagreed with were so totally beneath contempt
: that I didn't have to think a moment about their pathetic little viewpoints .

Well, John, perhaps you're right. I do often tend to get somewhat
emotional about these issues, unlike many others who couldn't care less,
hence such language. But my emotionalism comes primarily from a belief on
my part that significant areas of ancient American history are being
ignored by the mainstream academe, misunderstood, and distorted, often
intentionally it seems.

There's too much politics in this field, and not enough objectivity.
There's too much fear. As an example I can give the matter of the oldest
American pottery. Where is it? To me it is a very interesting question
that also happens to be hotly diputed. Not so long ago, I researched this
question and wrote what I thought were a number of balanced articles about
this. There was not a single reply in this newsgroup. My articles just
vanished into the ether. Why was it so? Nobody cares? Or, which I think is
more likely, is everyone afraid to deal with this because of the academic
politics involved? You tell me.

Regards,

Yuri.

Yuri Kuchinsky in Toronto -=O=- [23]http://www.io.org/~yuku

It is a far, far better thing to have a firm anchor in nonsense than
to put out on the troubled seas of thought -=O=- John K. Galbraith
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